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Factor V deficiency

Definition

Factor V deficiency is a condition that is passed down through families, which affects the ability of the blood to clot.

Alternative Names

Parahemophilia; Owren's disease; Bleeding disorder - Factor V deficiency

Causes

Blood clotting is a complex process involving as many as 20 different proteins in blood plasma. These proteins are called blood coagulation factors.

Factor V deficiency is caused by a lack of Factor V. When certain blood clotting factors are low or missing, your blood does not clot properly.

Factor V deficiency is rare. It may be caused by:

  • A defective Factor V gene passed down through families (inherited)
  • An antibody that interferes with normal Factor V function

You can get an antibody that interferes with Factor V:

  • After giving birth
  • After being treated with a certain type of fibrin glue
  • After surgery
  • With autoimmune diseases and certain cancers

Sometimes the cause is unknown.

The disease is similar to hemophilia, except bleeding into joints is less common. In the inherited form of Factor V deficiency, a family history of a bleeding disorder is a risk factor.

Symptoms

Excessive bleeding with menstrual periods and after childbirth often occurs. Other symptoms can include:

Exams and Tests

Tests to detect Factor V deficiency include:

Treatment

You will be given fresh blood plasma or fresh frozen plasma infusions during a bleeding episode or after surgery. These treatments will correct the deficiency temporarily.

Outlook (Prognosis)

The outlook is good with diagnosis and proper treatment.

Possible Complications

Severe bleeding (hemorrhage) could occur.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Go to the emergency room or call the local emergency number (such as 911) if you have an unexplained or prolonged loss of blood.

References

Gailani D, Neff AT. Rare coagulation factor deficiencies. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2013:chap 139.

Ragni MV. Hemorrhagic disorders In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 174.

Scott JP, Flood VH. Hereditary clotting factor deficiencies (bleeding disorders). In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 476.


Review Date: 2/1/2016
Reviewed By: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
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