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Midazolam (Injection)

Midazolam (MID-ay-zoe-lam)

Given before surgery or medical procedures to help you feel relaxed or sleepy.

Brand Name(s):

Novaplus Midazolam, Novaplus Midazolam Hydrochloride

There may be other brand names for this medicine.

When This Medicine Should Not Be Used:

You should not use this medicine if you have had an allergic reaction to midazolam or if you have narrow angle glaucoma.

How to Use This Medicine:

Injectable

  • Midazolam will be given to you in the hospital or doctor's office by a caregiver trained to use this medicine.
  • An IM injection is a shot given in your muscle (upper arm, thigh, buttocks). An IV injection is medicine that is put into your body through one of your veins.
  • The medicine begins to work quickly after it is given. You may start feeling its effects about 15 minutes (for the IM shot) or about 5 minutes (for the IV injection) after the medicine is given.
  • After you receive midazolam, you will be watched closely to make sure the medicine is working. Your breathing, blood pressure, nervous system, and heart will also be watched closely to make sure the medicine is not causing unwanted side effects.

Drugs and Foods to Avoid:

Ask your doctor or pharmacist before using any other medicine, including over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

  • Before you are given midazolam, make sure your doctor knows if you are using other medicines that may make you sleepy such as sleeping pills, tranquilizers, some cold and allergy medicine, narcotic pain-killers, or medicines that relax your muscles. Tell your doctor if you drink alcohol. You may get too drowsy or sedated if you drink alcohol or use medicines that cause drowsiness with midazolam.
  • Wait about 24 hours (or as your doctor orders) before drinking alcohol or using medicines that cause drowsiness.
  • Tell your doctor if you are using erythromycin or cimetidine (Tagamet®).

Warnings While Using This Medicine:

  • If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, talk to your doctor before you are given this medicine. Midazolam may cause birth defects or be harmful to an unborn baby if used during a pregnancy.
  • Before you receive this medicine, tell your doctor if you have heart, liver, kidney, or lung disease or open angle glaucoma.
  • This medicine will keep you from remembering events that take place during surgery.
  • Midazolam may make you drowsy or dizzy for 1 or 2 days after you receive it. Wait 24 hours or until the effects of the medicine have worn off (whichever is longer) before driving or using machinery.
  • The time it takes for the medicine to wear off varies with each person. However, it may take longer for older adults to recover from the medicine's effects.

Possible Side Effects While Using This Medicine:

If you notice these less serious side effects, talk with your doctor:

  • Redness, pain, or a lump where the injection is given
  • Hiccups
  • Nausea
  • Headache, dizziness
  • Drowsiness that continues after 2 days

If you notice other side effects that you think are caused by this medicine, tell your doctor

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088


Last Updated: 12/4/2014


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